2019-Code Energy Design Rating Fact Sheet

2019-Code Energy Design Rating Fact Sheet

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The 2019 residential energy code (2019-Code) will use a new energy efficiency metric to gauge code compliance: the Energy Design Rating (EDR) will replace compliance percent. Each metric accomplishes a similar task – determining if a proposed-home uses less energy than a prescriptive-home of the same size and in the same climate zone. The difference between compliance percent and EDR is simply the mathematical construct used behind the scenes in the modeling software and the inclusion of all energy end uses within EDR. CAHP participants may be familiar with the EDR already as it’s being used for program compliance with the 2016-Code program. Calculations for the EDR are currently available in CBECC-Res 2016 and EnergyPro 7. Instructions to activate and surface the EDR calculations can be found here. And Delta-EDR,…
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Testing the 2019-Code Software

Testing the 2019-Code Software

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The 2019-Code goes into effect January 1, 2020 -  just around the corner considering construction timelines. CAHP and CABEC strongly encourage all energy consultants to test out the 2019-Code beta software (also called research versions) before the code change. Testing will help gain familiarity with software and the new code, test how certain building designs fair, and surface bugs, errors, and missing features to inform the development team ahead of final release. For residential buildings, the new code includes: More stringent wall and attic insulation values, including QII in the reference baseline A new baseline for electric water heating The Energy Design rating - a brand new method of code compliance that requires a user adhere to both an Efficiency-EDR and a Final-EDR simultaneously (see CAHP’s EDR Fact Sheet for…
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Three Reasons Builders Should Incorporate High Performance Attics and Walls Now

Three Reasons Builders Should Incorporate High Performance Attics and Walls Now

Tech Tip
While California’s 2016 building code mandates construction of high performance attics (HPA) and high performance walls (HPW) in all new single family homes, many builders elect to build to the performance path, which allows for conventional attics and walls if the builder installs other above code measures, most often solar photovoltaics (PV). However, there are many factors for builders to assess when considering whether to incorporate these design features into new homes now—including the fact that the 2019 code is just around the corner. Below are three reasons California builders should start incorporating HPA and HPW into new homes now. Be Prepared for 2019 Code On January 1, 2020—a short 15 months away—2019 California building code will come into effect. 2019 code not only requires more efficient energy measures (including…
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New Bonus Options Available!

New Bonus Options Available!

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The California Advanced Homes Program (CAHP) and California Multifamily New Homes (CMFNH) program provide EDR and cash bonuses for industry best-practice measures to reward builders and homeowners. These bonuses also help offset the incremental costs for these added measures. These new cash bonuses are model-able and are available for all 2016 code single-family and low-rise multifamily projects, as applicable. Quality Insulation Installation (QII): Single family and low-rise multifamily projects QII outlines a procedure to verify proper installation of insulation to maximize thermal benefit per methods detailed in the Residential Appendix RA3.5, and applies to floors, walls, roofs and ceilings. Claiming compliance credit for QII requires that a third-party HERS Rater verifies the integrity of the installed insulation. Reduced Building Air Leakage: Single family projects only Lower building air leakage yields…
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EnergyCode ACE Webinar: Advanced Energy Rebuild Program, Introduction for Architects & CEAs

EnergyCode ACE Webinar: Advanced Energy Rebuild Program, Introduction for Architects & CEAs

Tech Tip, Training, Uncategorized
EnergyCode ACE has announced two upcoming sessions for their webinar covering the Advanced Energy Rebuild (AER) program. The webinar is designed to help architects and Certified Energy Analysts (CEAs) understand the essential considerations for successful participation in the AER program that Sonoma Clean Power, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District jointly offer to help homeowners affected by the October 2017 firestorms rebuild energy-efficient and sustainable homes. During the session, presenters Martyn Dodd and Ted Tiffany will cover the program requirements, explore alternatives for meeting those requirements, and open the floor for participants to share ideas, concerns, and questions with other architects and energy analysts. This course is geared towards architects and CEAs who anticipate working on residential new construction projects in Sonoma and…
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Recent Software Updates Increase Eligibility and Incentives!

Tech Tip
Does your project have electric dryers and cooking? Recent software updates could improve your project’s eligibility or incentive for the California Advanced Homes Program and the California Multifamily New Homes Program. Single family and low-rise multifamily projects with electric dryers and electric cooking that previously did not qualify due to low Delta EDR scores, may now be eligible for the California Advanced Homes Program (CAHP) and California Multifamily New Homes (CMFNH) Program using the most current Title 24 Compliance software. The most current versions, namely, CBECC-Res 2016.3.0 (SP2) and Energy Pro 7.2.2, have updated the rulesets to include an electric baseline for appliances. This means that the software now allows for a direct comparison between fuel types. Read on to see examples of how the fuel selection impacts the EDR…
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CEC 15-Day Language Released

CEC 15-Day Language Released

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The California Energy Commission has released 15-Day Language for the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6). The deadline to submit comments is May 7th at 5:00 pm PST. To view the draft code language, follow this link.   To submit written comments, you may: 1. Submit comments online to the Dockets Unit 2. Send an email to the Dockets Unit Contact: docket@energy.ca.gov Subject line: 2019 Title 24, Part 6, Building Energy Efficiency Standards Rulemaking 3. Mail comments to the CEC California Energy Commission Docket Unit, MS-4 Re: Docket No 17-BSTD-02 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, CA 95814        
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Program Bonus: DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes

Program Bonus: DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The California Advanced Homes Program (CAHP) offers a bonus for homes enrolled in the Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Homes program. This program recognizes builders for leadership in increasing energy efficiency, improving indoor air quality, and making homes zero energy ready. DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes are verified by a qualified third-party and are at least 40 to 50 percent more energy efficient than a typical new home. To qualify for the DEO Zero Energy Ready Home program, homes must meet minimum requirements, be verified and field tested in accordance with HERS Standards by an approved verifier, and meet all applicable codes. Builders may meet the requirements of either the Performance Path or the Prescriptive Path to qualify a home. To learn more about the program benefits and…
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QII and the 2019 Code: What You Need to Know Now

QII and the 2019 Code: What You Need to Know Now

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The California Energy Commission (CEC) has set a standard for the way insulation should be installed in a home, called High Quality Insulation Installation (QII). To meet QII, insulated framing areas need to resist thermal bridging of the assembly separating a conditioned space from an unconditioned space. For more general information on QII, please follow this link. The Codes and Standards Enhancement (CASE) initiative is proposing to include QII in the 2019 Title 24 code as a prescriptive requirement for all climate zones, except low-rise multifamily buildings in Climate Zone 7. Per the California Statewide Utility Codes and Standards Program, under the 2013 and 2016 code a compliance credit is awarded for installations that perform QII. The Standard Design assumes that builders are not performing QII. Wall insulation values are…
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How to Generate Your Delta Energy Design Rating

How to Generate Your Delta Energy Design Rating

Tech Tip, Uncategorized
The 2017 California Advanced Homes Program (CAHP) adopts the CEC’s new energy performance metric for determining project eligibility: the Delta Energy Design Rating, or Delta EDR. In order to determine whether your project will meet the entry level Delta EDR to enroll in the program, please follow the steps listed in the resource below. The CAHP team has put together an overview of what the Delta EDR is, and how you can generate your score using CBECC-RES and EnergyPro. Click here to view the Generation of Delta EDR guide
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